Original Gravity to launch in Toronto

Original Gravity to launch in Toronto

Original Gravity magazine is expanding overseas and will launch in Toronto on May 17. Toronto-based Stephen Beaumont, one of the world’s most respected beer writers, will be its Editor-in-Chief

 

Daniel Neilson, publisher of the leading British beer publication Original Gravity, and Stephen Beaumont, award-winning author or co-author of 13 books on beer, including the best-selling World Atlas of Beer, are pleased to announce the launch of a unique Toronto edition of Original Gravity!

Over the past decade or more, the beer and brewery scene in Toronto has grown dramatically in both numbers and overall quality, but drinks journalism in Canada’s largest city has not kept pace with these changes, being largely confined to beer news websites and blogs. Original Gravity seeks to change that, with outstanding columns and articles from many of the beer world’s top writers, including the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Stephen Beaumont.

“Toronto has been crying out for a top beer publication for a long time,” says Beaumont, “So when Daniel approached me with the idea of launching a local version of Original Gravity, a magazine I have long admired on my visits to London, I leapt at the chance.”

Although English by birthright, publisher Neilson has roots in Canada, having worked here and being husband to a Canadian, so expanding Original Gravity to the shores of Lake Ontario was a natural move for him.

Original Gravity in the UK is a respected publication with an interesting angle that appeals to all readers, from the merely craft beer-curious to die-hard beer enthusiasts,” says Neilson, “When I decided to launch in Canada, there was only one person to approach, and that was Stephen Beaumont, one of the world’s most respected beer writers. As editor-in-chief, Stephen will bring his vast expertise and brilliant writing to the magazine.”

To start, Original Gravity will be published quarterly, with three issues in 2018 beginning with a spring/summer edition that will launch on May 17. Featured will be Toronto-centric versions of columns popular with Original Gravity’s UK audience, including ‘The Art of Beer’ and beer style focused ‘The 6-Pack,’ as well as longer-form articles by Beaumont, Ontario Craft Beer Guide co-author Jordan St. John and others.

Specific details for the launch of the Canadian Original Gravity are still being worked out at the time of writing, but we couldn’t wait any longer to get out word that Toronto is finally about to get the beer magazine it deserves!

For further details:

Stephen Beaumont, stephen@originalgravitymag.com

Daniel Neilson, daniel@originalgravitymag.com

For advertising enquiries:

Jessica Olivier,jess@originalgravitymag.com


A pub table and a beer

A pub table and a beer

The pub is a mediator to the events life can often throw in your way. By Jessica Mason

 

It is a setting where we can unravel as people — where we can laugh and where we can cry without judgement. And it can, on some occasions, nurse our hearts and minds back to health.

I didn’t know my real father. He was Indian-Malay and I only met him a handful of times. Even though my mum had a court order to keep him away, if he showed up on our doorstep he’d be welcomed in. Sometimes, he would bring stories. Other times, new siblings.

By the time I was a teenager, the man with the leather trousers who I had seen approximately five times in my life had completely disappeared.

When I was 20 and the internet was just getting going, a friend and I tracked down my old surname and found an uncle of mine living in Germany. He’d been the best man at my parents’ wedding. He didn’t know where my father was either, but he asked me to visit. It was the first time I had ever been in an aeroplane and flying out to meet him and his son, a cousin of mine, I felt a deep surge of hopefulness. I was going to discover a family I had never known.

Two days later, after running barefoot down the streets of Dortmund at night, flagging down a car and spending time in a police station, I was flown back to the UK chaperoned, for safety reasons, by the British Consulate. My uncle, after telling me rather a lot about his brother, “the person whom everyone liked,” took away my naivety and replaced it with a fear I had never known.

My university pals, who had helped in my escape, took me to the pub and, within the walls of the Mash Tun and the Black Boy in Winchester, they nursed me back to life with love and beer and the unspoken familiarity of friendship that bound us like a family of our own.

At age 26, to my bewilderment I became a parent myself. So when an out-of-the-blue phone call led to information on my real father’s whereabouts, I was wary. I greeted the event not as the animated optimist, but as a protective, yet numb sage. I suggested meeting on neutral territory – a pub.

I knew I had mere hours with a man I didn’t know. But with a hundred questions in my head none of which could be answered by someone intent on impressing me, I would need to put my questions aside and make him feel at ease enough to remove his veneer. But how would I do that? Strangely enough, I did know. I needed just two simple props: a pub table and some beer.

I recognised him immediately. Not because the crumpled wedding photograph of the smiling man I’d been carrying around for years resembled the homeless man in front of me, but because we shared the same eyes. Two deep dark pools of despair looked back at me like a foreboding reflection. His carrier bag of possessions was at his feet and he was wearing a suit at least three sizes too big for his frame and a red baseball cap. He told me he had taken the day off of work especially to meet me and that he was “a business consultant”. I smiled and bought him a pint, saying I hoped he wasn’t going to be missed at the office that day.

That evening, he introduced me to his friends and I bought the rounds. His friends, who also had their work bags or kitbags stowed beneath the table, regaled me with proud stories of my father’s cheekiness, his humour and willingness to help others. Traits I’d never personally been privy to, but nor could I dismiss as non-existent. The man had nothing, but he clearly still had mates.

When I took the train back home that evening, I thought about the dimly-lit pub and the things I had learnt on the premises. It had only taken an hour to deduce that the man before me was, quite possibly, the worst man I had ever met in my entire life. He wanted to be admired, only the version of himself he had conjured didn’t really exist. He was the Moon Under Water, personified. He was not the father of which anyone might dream. Yet, in his presence, while my heart silently moved from my throat to the pit of my stomach, hopefulness was replaced by avid fascination. He was a performer and the pub was his stage. I didn’t need to like him; I didn’t need to know him. He was the jester in his court and I was simply his audience for the night.

And there is no remorse. Because we are all kinds of people, drifting through life and some of us are better at getting things right than others – these hostelries we have in Britain taught me that. They strip us down to the bare souls of the people we are and they bind friendships and relationships. They make us people of mirth and they remind us that being ourselves is enough. They are there for the good days and the bad, because life does that – it just keeps throwing things our way.

And even when things don’t go our way, there’s something we can do about it. We can reset our perspective and, within mine, there’s always a pub table and a beer.

R.I.P. The man who gave me my eyes.

/ @drinksmaven


Dark Star Brewing bought by Fuller's

Fuller’s buys Dark Star Brewing

Brighton craft brewer Dark Star has been bought by Fuller’s, it was announced this morning

 

Brighton craft brewer Dark Star has been bought by Fuller’s, it was announced this morning.

The full details of the deal have yet to be revealed, but the move came after a period of the two breweries working successfully together. It’s believed that Dark Star has been exploring various sources of financing to fuel continued expansion in an increasingly competitive market and that the acquisition was one of the alternatives being considered.

Many commentators (including us here at Original Gravity) have predicted that 2018 will see a sharp increase in the number of craft breweries acquired by bigger players. While sales of craft beer overall continue to rise sharply, from a brewer’s perspective trading conditions are increasingly tough in a market that some estimates put at over 2,000 UK brewers.

Dark Star was founded in 1994 in the cellar of Brighton’s Evening Star pub and went on to be a pioneer of the UK craft beer movement, with Hophead being an early champion of the US hop-forward pale ale style.

Fuller’s, founded in 1845, has won respect for its stance on the burgeoning craft beer scene, becoming a founder member of the London Brewers’ Alliance, recreating old recipes from its archives and recently launching ‘Fullers & Friends’, a series of collaborations with breweries including Thornbridge, Cloudwater and Fourpure.

QUOTES FROM PRESS RELEASE

Brewing will continue at Dark Star’s Partridge Green site, Managing Director James Cuthbertson will remain at the helm and the brewer will continue to operate as a standalone business.

James Cuthbertson said: “Since our inception in 1994, we have continuously grown from those early days in The Evening Star Pub in Brighton to the current brewery in Partridge Green. The partnership with Fuller’s, another independent brewery with fantastic heritage and great beer at its very core, will allow us to take the brewery to the next level. The deal means we will continue to do what we do, but gives us huge opportunities to brew more one-off small batch beers hand-in-hand with exploring the export market and expanded bottle and can formats.”

He added: “We’ve always described Dark Star as more of a hobby that got out of control than a business, an ethos that will remain at the centre of what we do and what we’re about, after all, beer should be fun and accessible.”

Simon Dodd, Managing Director of The Fuller’s Beer Company, said: “Following on from the success we have had with our acquisition of Cornish Orchards, we have been looking at similar opportunities to invest in and work with young, exciting companies that have a similar ethos and commitment to quality as Fuller’s. Following discussions with James and the team at Dark Star, we could see that we could add real benefit to the Dark Star business and it provides a great new range of delicious cask beers that will enhance the Fuller’s portfolio.

“Both Fuller’s and Dark Star are brewers with quality and taste at their heart. I just can’t wait to see how Dark Star innovates further with the support of Fuller’s and access to our expertise in brewing, retailing and business elements such as finance, purchasing and IT systems.”


Five Points announce charity partnership

Five Points announce annual charity partnership

The Hackney-based brewery commits to fundraising efforts and staff paid time to support its local charities

 

The East London-based Five Points Brewing Company has announced the start of a new annual charity partnership programme. Each year the company will partner with two local charities, fundraising for them and helping to raise their profile across the year. Brewery staff are encouraged to have an input: they will be canvassed for their suggestions on which charities will be supported that year, and can complete a day’s paid voluntary work on behalf of their chosen charity.

This year, it is two charities local to the brewery that have been chosen to receive support. The Hackney Winter Night Shelter, a homeless shelter running during the coldest winter months, and Headway East London, a charity supporting people affected by brain injury, will both receive fundraising support across the year.

Ed Mason, founder and Director of The Five Points, said: “Since founding The Five Points in 2013, we have strived to be a socially responsible business and employer, based in our local community. The community has taken us into their hearts, and it’s important for us to give something back.

“Our ethos is not just about ‘the bottom line’. While of course this is important, we believe that businesses also have a responsibility to both the local and wider community. Supporting two partner charities each year is a great way for us to be able to demonstrate this commitment and responsibility.”

The Five Points has also improved its Charity and Community Support Policy. All staff members will receive an additional day’s paid leave to work on a charity or community project. Staff will be working with the 2018 partner charities, The Hackney Winter Night Shelter and Headway East London, but are welcome to work on their own projects if there’s an issue or organisation close to their heart.

The Five Points organises a large number of events every year; in 2017, they organised over 100, hosting and participating in events and festivals around London and across the UK. Their first 2018 fundraising event, the Tryanuary Hackney Beer Hop, is taking place on Saturday 27th January, and will visit five different breweries and craft beer-spots in Hackney Wick, including the Five Points’ craft beer bar Mason & Company. The event is now sold-out, and all ticket and raffle proceeds, plus donations on the day, will go to the Hackney Winter Night Shelter.

You can read more about The Five Points’ charity support on their blog, and stay up to date with future fundraising events on their website, Twitter, Facebook and Eventbrite pages. If you would like to read more about the two charities, or sign up to volunteer, visit www.headwayeastlondon.org and www.hwns.org.


CAMRA to embrace kegged and canned 'quality' beer

CAMRA to embrace ‘quality’ kegged and canned beer

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April

 

We’ll have some updated news and opinions soon but first we wanted to share the press release as soon as we can in full that advocates that CAMRA, as part of its far-reaching Revitalisation, it will embrace ‘quality’ beer and not just real ale.

STARTS

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April.

While continuing to advocate that real ale is the pinnacle of the brewer’s craft, the Campaign’s wider focus will mean all drinkers who enjoy a range of beers, ciders and perries will feel welcome in the organisation.

If the changes are approved, the Campaign will work to provide an enhanced education and information experience for its members, and all drinkers who attend CAMRA festivals, to help them appreciate and learn about all types and styles of beer, cider and perry – and make informed decisions about what constitutes “quality”.

While campaigning for the continued production and consumption of real ale, cider and perry will remain at the core of CAMRA’s objectives, members will be asked to consider changes to the organisation’s Articles of Association which will widen the range of types of beer that it represents – including quality beer which does not meet the organisation’s definition of “real ale”.

The recommendations also propose that as a result of widening its scope of interest CAMRA will be able to represent and engage with all beer drinkers and with all pubgoers, irrespective of what they choose to drink, increasing its ability to campaign in the interests of a much larger constituency.

This broadening of consumer representation will also see CAMRA demonstrate an interest in and lobby for a much wider range of on-trade outlets. While the organisation will continue to campaign for the preservation of the traditional British pub, it will also encourage on-trade outlets of all kinds to serve quality beer, cider and perry. CAMRA will continue to advocate drinking in public social venues, rather than the increasing practise of consumers buying their drinks from supermarkets for home consumption.

The proposed changes may take the form of:

  • CAMRA festivals offering a wider range of quality beers, ciders and perries in all formats

  • CAMRA engaging with drinkers of all types – with the hope of taking them on a ‘journey of discovery’ of why real ale, cider and perry is particularly special

  • CAMRA supporting members in their appreciation of beer, their ability to both recognise quality products and campaign effectively for them to be stocked in pubs and bars

  • CAMRA providing information about all kinds of beer, not just real ale, as well as opportunities for members to learn more about brewing and the different types and styles available to drinkers

  • CAMRA recognising a wider range of drinks and establishments in its local and national competitions

The 46-year-old consumer organisation launched a root and branch review of its purpose and objectives, called the Revitalisation Project, at the start of 2016. CAMRA’s 190,000 members have been involved and consulted throughout the process and will soon have their say on whether the resulting proposals for change are adopted.

Seeking approval for their recommendations, the Campaign’s leadership argue that a wider appeal and closer connection with the current revolution in beer and bars will enable the organisation to connect with modern-day beer drinkers and pub goers. This in turn will strengthen CAMRA’s campaigning voice: enabling it to increase the already-considerable influence it exerts on the Government and industry decision-makers.

CAMRA chairman Colin Valentine said: “It’s always been important that our members have had a say throughout this review process and we’re now at the point where we’ll be giving all our members the chance to vote on the final Revitalisation Project recommendations.

“The vote will be held at our Annual General Meeting, in Coventry in April. In the months between now and then we’ll be making sure members can access the full details of the changes we’re recommending, along with the analysis of the impacts and potential opportunities the changes will have.

“My colleagues and I will be making ourselves available at meetings around the country over the next three months so that members can ask us questions about the proposed changes. We’ll also be making sure that we’re available online at frequent intervals. At the end of this process our aim is to make sure that every member has been given the opportunity to learn more about the proposals before they voted.

“Our recommendations mark an important stage in CAMRA’s long history. We recognise that the beer and pub landscape has changed and continues to evolve, and our place in that landscape has changed as well. We’re determined to make sure that we continue to change and evolve so that we are relevant to drinkers of all types and continue to offer a compelling reason for people to join our organisation.”

ENDS


Yeastie Boys announce new Head Brewer

Yeastie Boys announce new head brewer

Former Thornbridge and Buxton brewer James Kemp will join the Yeastie Boys UK operation

 

New Zealand brewing company Yeastie Boys have taken a further step toward making United Kingdom their major focus by announcing the signing of renowned brewer James Kemp from Manchester’s Marble Brewery.

From mid-March James – a respected former brewer of Thornbridge Brewery and Buxton Brewery – will take over the lead brewing role for the small multinational New Zealand company.


Yeastie Boys’ irreverent ales – founded down under in 2008 and now brewed in New Zealand, Australia, and United Kingdom – have made a considerable impact in the UK since arriving in 2015 and the business recently announced that they had tripled UK sales in the 2017 calendar year.

“We’ve got off to a cracking start in the UK, from absolutely nothing, but we’re always thinking of the future and this was the perfect place to bring someone on board” Yeastie Boys’ founder Stu McKinlay explained.

“Bringing James into the team is an investment in our brand as well as the product. We’ve long been known for innovation but in the UK we’ve focused on our core range products, only bringing in very small volumes of seasonals and specials from New Zealand.

“As our reach expands nationally and into Europe, and often outside the traditional ‘craft beer’ venues, it’s important to us that we continue to excite and delight the independent trade and that needs to happen from here in the UK rather than back in New Zealand. I can’t think of anyone better to do that than James Kemp. I’ve known him for over a decade and his dedication to innovation and quality make him one of the very best brewers that I know.”

James Kemp said: “I’ve been a fanboy of Yeastie Boys since I first tried Pot Kettle Black almost ten years ago and I’ve always considered them to be one of the most exciting and edgy breweries in the world. I’m really looking forward to having a lot of fun making great beer and helping take them to the next level.

“We’ve not mapped out an exact plan of what we’ll brew, yet, as we really want to let James focus all his energy on his last couple of months at Marble” added Stu, “but expect a good dose of easily accessible seasonal beers, possibly with melon balls, followed by a really exciting long-term focus on elegant and very special beers.”

Yeastie Boys – who celebrate their tenth year in 2018 – are now just over two years into in brewing in UK and are a year into production in Australia.
 
“Exporting our products around the world is becoming less of an option as we see local beer scenes really exploding in terms of both diversity and quality,” said the UK-based McKinlay, “The setup of Yeastie Boys UK and Yeastie Boys Australia allows us to build a base making local beers with a New Zealand accent. We’ve got to the point where we really needed someone far better than me to oversee all this production and James is the perfect person for that job!”


Celebrate Harry and Megan's wedding with Windsor Knot beer

Celebrate the Royal Wedding with Windsor Knot

In easily the best tie-in to Harry and Megan’s impending marriage we’ve seen so far is the Windsor Knot beer from Windsor & Eton Brewery

 

Windsor & Eton Brewery has a Royal connection based on proximity alone, but in a clever tie-in with the Royal wedding, the brewery has released a beer called Harry & Megan’s Windsor Knot using barley grown on the Royal farms. 

The beer is a special limited edition release of their best-selling Windsor Knot, which was first brewed for the marriage of Harry’s brother, Will. Just like the original Windsor Knot, this pale ale will be the only royal wedding beer brewed in Windsor.

The new beer was inspired by the couple’s first public appearance together at the Invictus Games in Toronto last year.

Master Brewer and Co-Founder Paddy Johnson explains: “We’ve really had a lot of fun developing this new beer. We wanted to create a beer that captured something of that first appearance.  We use a special blend of British hops called Invicta in recognition of Prince Harry’s role in creating the Invictus Games, combined with some great American West Coast hops. As with all our beers, we use barley grown locally on the Royal Farms right here in Windsor and as a finishing touch, we are using champagne yeast. Marrying these ingredients creates a new Pale Ale that is young, fresh and full of character.”

Co-Founder Will Calvert talks more about the design: “When Harry & Meghan tie the knot it will be very much a modern marriage of equals as well as being a celebration of their British and American nationalities. Each of them have causes that they care deeply about such as the environment, equal rights and the rehabilitation of injured servicemen and women. We chose the interlocking symbols to reflect the strength and support they give each other.”


Harry & Meghan Windsor Knot will be available in both 330ml bottles at 4.5% ABV and in cask at 4% ABV and the first orders are shipped on Tuesday 3rd April.


Anatomy of: Barley Wine

Anatomy of barley wine

The barley wine, one of the strongest tipples of the beer canon, is designed for cold days barley lit by the winter sun. Here’s all you need to know about it and three of the best. Image: The British Library

 

A barley wine is a contemplative beer, the kind of beer that you pour out in small measures, a beer that has rich fruity overtones, luscious maltiness and a fiery booziness. It’s usually dark amber in colour, but there are also pale barley wines, and it’s strong enough to make a cat speak.

Because of its strength it has always been a minority pursuit, but sustained study of its attributes reveals a beautiful beer that could be seen as the height of the brewer’s art. British brewers got there first but now barley wine is produced all over the world with North American riffs on the style invariably more hop forward. Drink deeply and study hard this style.  ATJ

STRENGTH
Some start at the relatively light strength of 7.5%, while others stretch out their limbs towards 12 or 13%. So far no one has claimed a session barley wine.

FLAVOUR
Lush is the word you might be looking for on the first sip, with rich notes of dark or dried fruit, smooth chocolate, caramel, vanilla and occasionally a bracing bitterness.

APPEARANCE
Dark mysterious amber or a well-polished mahogany though some barley wines can also be reddish gold in colour. Dive into an enticing tan-coloured head of foam.

HISTORY
‘The barley wine of the English Rhine’ was a slogan used by a brewery in the 1880s, though it wasn’t until the early 1900s after Bass’ No1 Burton Ale was called a barley wine that it was more commonly used.

AKA
Some would say that barley wine is also interchangeable with a Burton ale or even an old ale. Best to keep things simple though.

FOOD
It’s an end-of-dinner drink so eschew the port for the barley wine, especially if it’s accompanied by a slab of creamy, pungent Stilton — that way heaven lies.

WHERE TO DRINK
Because of its strength, it’s either a seasonal or brewed intermittently. Scour your local bottle shop

WEIRD FACT
British barley wine drinkers used to call the style a ‘sitting down beer’, because they had less distance to fall if they’d imbibed too deeply of it. Honest.

THREE OF THE BEST

/  Cameron’s, Where the Buffalo Roam, 11.2%
Time well spent in bourbon barrels gives this Canadian barley wine a sleek and warming character with delicate waves of vanilla, dried fruit and rich malt.

/  Arbor, Barley Davidson, 9.7%
Citra, Simcoe and Mosaic combine with nine months of barrel ageing to create a luscious and potent, fruity and caramel-smooth
palate-pleaser.

/  Harvey’s, Christmas Ale, 7.5%
If you left this burnished mahogany hued and richly malty beauty out for Santa on Christmas Eve he’d be reluctant to leave and demand more.


Beer Moment of the Year: Daniel Neilson

Beer Moment of the Year: Daniel Neilson

The pub. The wonderful, cosy, convivial pub made the beer moment of the year for Original Gravity’s publisher Daniel Neilson

 

Life is too short to be indulgent when it comes to writing about beer, but as the year seems certain to immolate itself once more, Original Gravity has decided that its self-imposed rule about indulgence can be broken for once — here, then, is the team’s beer moment (s) of the year. We’ll see you in 2018, we’ve got a few things we going to do that we think we will like (you might as well, but we certainly will).

For our next moment, it’s the founder Daniel Neilson

Daniel Neilson, Original Gravity’s Founder

I’ve been very lucky this year to meet a great many people in the beer industry who I deeply admire. Meeting Jamie in the lovely Highland setting of his brewery Fyne Ales was a highlight. Other visits, including Siren, Burning Sky, Wiper and True, Lost & Grounded, Thornbridge and many more, were all united by one thing: the unerring, relentless passion of beer. 

My beer moment of the year, however, was a little closer to home. 

They call it the Cathedral, Harvey’s Brewery in Lewes. I was there on an ‘away day’ with Pete Brown, Adrian Tierney-Jones and the designer Adam McNaught-Davis. After a  planning session and a tour of the ‘Cathedral’ we all retired to the John Harvey Tavern for lunch. And it was there, as I took a long draught on Harvey’s Sussex Best Bitter and looked around the table, that I marvelled the power of a humble drink in a humble pub. Beer had brought together great brewers, great beer writers and great friends. I sat down again and the banter continued.  


Beer Moment of the Year: Pete Brown

Beer Moment of the Year: Pete Brown

That was the year that was. And for Original Gravity’s Editor at Large Pete Brown, the great beer moments of the year happened on a trip to America

 

Life is too short to be indulgent when it comes to writing about beer, but as the year seems certain to immolate itself once more, Original Gravity has decided that its self-imposed rule about indulgence can be broken for once — here, then, is the team’s beer moment (s) of the year. We’ll see you in 2018, we’ve got a few things we going to do that we think we will like (you might as well, but we certainly will).

For our second moment, it’s our Editor-at-Large Pete Brown

Pete Brown, Original Gravity Editor-at-large

My beer moment of the year has to be the mini-book tour of North America I undertook to promote my new book, Miracle Brew. Most of my events took place in breweries, and my publisher is in Vermont, so, apart from flogging a few books, I got to visit some of the most exciting breweries around right now.

I kicked off with a talk at the Brooklyn Brewery, after which Brooklyn brewmaster Garrett Oliver dragged out some of his ‘ghost bottles’ for us to taste — strong, experimental beers aged in wood with a variety of different yeast and microorganisms that start to blur the boundary between beer and wine.

A few days later I was at Hill Farmstead in Vermont, watching the queue for growler fills of their New England IPAs and Belgian style beers grow outside an hour before the taproom doors opened. And then up to Toronto, a city I’ve loved for a long time, that’s now starting to transcend its beery influences and excel in styles that are different from what you might find in bars elsewhere. In 2018, keep an eye out for the Canadians.

—–

Tomorrow evening Original Gravity’s Publisher Daniel Neilson picks his moment of the year.