CAMRA to embrace kegged and canned 'quality' beer

CAMRA to embrace ‘quality’ kegged and canned beer

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April

 

We’ll have some updated news and opinions soon but first we wanted to share the press release as soon as we can in full that advocates that CAMRA, as part of its far-reaching Revitalisation, it will embrace ‘quality’ beer and not just real ale.

STARTS

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April.

While continuing to advocate that real ale is the pinnacle of the brewer’s craft, the Campaign’s wider focus will mean all drinkers who enjoy a range of beers, ciders and perries will feel welcome in the organisation.

If the changes are approved, the Campaign will work to provide an enhanced education and information experience for its members, and all drinkers who attend CAMRA festivals, to help them appreciate and learn about all types and styles of beer, cider and perry – and make informed decisions about what constitutes “quality”.

While campaigning for the continued production and consumption of real ale, cider and perry will remain at the core of CAMRA’s objectives, members will be asked to consider changes to the organisation’s Articles of Association which will widen the range of types of beer that it represents – including quality beer which does not meet the organisation’s definition of “real ale”.

The recommendations also propose that as a result of widening its scope of interest CAMRA will be able to represent and engage with all beer drinkers and with all pubgoers, irrespective of what they choose to drink, increasing its ability to campaign in the interests of a much larger constituency.

This broadening of consumer representation will also see CAMRA demonstrate an interest in and lobby for a much wider range of on-trade outlets. While the organisation will continue to campaign for the preservation of the traditional British pub, it will also encourage on-trade outlets of all kinds to serve quality beer, cider and perry. CAMRA will continue to advocate drinking in public social venues, rather than the increasing practise of consumers buying their drinks from supermarkets for home consumption.

The proposed changes may take the form of:

  • CAMRA festivals offering a wider range of quality beers, ciders and perries in all formats

  • CAMRA engaging with drinkers of all types – with the hope of taking them on a ‘journey of discovery’ of why real ale, cider and perry is particularly special

  • CAMRA supporting members in their appreciation of beer, their ability to both recognise quality products and campaign effectively for them to be stocked in pubs and bars

  • CAMRA providing information about all kinds of beer, not just real ale, as well as opportunities for members to learn more about brewing and the different types and styles available to drinkers

  • CAMRA recognising a wider range of drinks and establishments in its local and national competitions

The 46-year-old consumer organisation launched a root and branch review of its purpose and objectives, called the Revitalisation Project, at the start of 2016. CAMRA’s 190,000 members have been involved and consulted throughout the process and will soon have their say on whether the resulting proposals for change are adopted.

Seeking approval for their recommendations, the Campaign’s leadership argue that a wider appeal and closer connection with the current revolution in beer and bars will enable the organisation to connect with modern-day beer drinkers and pub goers. This in turn will strengthen CAMRA’s campaigning voice: enabling it to increase the already-considerable influence it exerts on the Government and industry decision-makers.

CAMRA chairman Colin Valentine said: “It’s always been important that our members have had a say throughout this review process and we’re now at the point where we’ll be giving all our members the chance to vote on the final Revitalisation Project recommendations.

“The vote will be held at our Annual General Meeting, in Coventry in April. In the months between now and then we’ll be making sure members can access the full details of the changes we’re recommending, along with the analysis of the impacts and potential opportunities the changes will have.

“My colleagues and I will be making ourselves available at meetings around the country over the next three months so that members can ask us questions about the proposed changes. We’ll also be making sure that we’re available online at frequent intervals. At the end of this process our aim is to make sure that every member has been given the opportunity to learn more about the proposals before they voted.

“Our recommendations mark an important stage in CAMRA’s long history. We recognise that the beer and pub landscape has changed and continues to evolve, and our place in that landscape has changed as well. We’re determined to make sure that we continue to change and evolve so that we are relevant to drinkers of all types and continue to offer a compelling reason for people to join our organisation.”

ENDS


Yeastie Boys announce new Head Brewer

Yeastie Boys announce new head brewer

Former Thornbridge and Buxton brewer James Kemp will join the Yeastie Boys UK operation

 

New Zealand brewing company Yeastie Boys have taken a further step toward making United Kingdom their major focus by announcing the signing of renowned brewer James Kemp from Manchester’s Marble Brewery.

From mid-March James – a respected former brewer of Thornbridge Brewery and Buxton Brewery – will take over the lead brewing role for the small multinational New Zealand company.


Yeastie Boys’ irreverent ales – founded down under in 2008 and now brewed in New Zealand, Australia, and United Kingdom – have made a considerable impact in the UK since arriving in 2015 and the business recently announced that they had tripled UK sales in the 2017 calendar year.

“We’ve got off to a cracking start in the UK, from absolutely nothing, but we’re always thinking of the future and this was the perfect place to bring someone on board” Yeastie Boys’ founder Stu McKinlay explained.

“Bringing James into the team is an investment in our brand as well as the product. We’ve long been known for innovation but in the UK we’ve focused on our core range products, only bringing in very small volumes of seasonals and specials from New Zealand.

“As our reach expands nationally and into Europe, and often outside the traditional ‘craft beer’ venues, it’s important to us that we continue to excite and delight the independent trade and that needs to happen from here in the UK rather than back in New Zealand. I can’t think of anyone better to do that than James Kemp. I’ve known him for over a decade and his dedication to innovation and quality make him one of the very best brewers that I know.”

James Kemp said: “I’ve been a fanboy of Yeastie Boys since I first tried Pot Kettle Black almost ten years ago and I’ve always considered them to be one of the most exciting and edgy breweries in the world. I’m really looking forward to having a lot of fun making great beer and helping take them to the next level.

“We’ve not mapped out an exact plan of what we’ll brew, yet, as we really want to let James focus all his energy on his last couple of months at Marble” added Stu, “but expect a good dose of easily accessible seasonal beers, possibly with melon balls, followed by a really exciting long-term focus on elegant and very special beers.”

Yeastie Boys – who celebrate their tenth year in 2018 – are now just over two years into in brewing in UK and are a year into production in Australia.
 
“Exporting our products around the world is becoming less of an option as we see local beer scenes really exploding in terms of both diversity and quality,” said the UK-based McKinlay, “The setup of Yeastie Boys UK and Yeastie Boys Australia allows us to build a base making local beers with a New Zealand accent. We’ve got to the point where we really needed someone far better than me to oversee all this production and James is the perfect person for that job!”


Celebrate Harry and Megan's wedding with Windsor Knot beer

Celebrate the Royal Wedding with Windsor Knot

In easily the best tie-in to Harry and Megan’s impending marriage we’ve seen so far is the Windsor Knot beer from Windsor & Eton Brewery

 

Windsor & Eton Brewery has a Royal connection based on proximity alone, but in a clever tie-in with the Royal wedding, the brewery has released a beer called Harry & Megan’s Windsor Knot using barley grown on the Royal farms. 

The beer is a special limited edition release of their best-selling Windsor Knot, which was first brewed for the marriage of Harry’s brother, Will. Just like the original Windsor Knot, this pale ale will be the only royal wedding beer brewed in Windsor.

The new beer was inspired by the couple’s first public appearance together at the Invictus Games in Toronto last year.

Master Brewer and Co-Founder Paddy Johnson explains: “We’ve really had a lot of fun developing this new beer. We wanted to create a beer that captured something of that first appearance.  We use a special blend of British hops called Invicta in recognition of Prince Harry’s role in creating the Invictus Games, combined with some great American West Coast hops. As with all our beers, we use barley grown locally on the Royal Farms right here in Windsor and as a finishing touch, we are using champagne yeast. Marrying these ingredients creates a new Pale Ale that is young, fresh and full of character.”

Co-Founder Will Calvert talks more about the design: “When Harry & Meghan tie the knot it will be very much a modern marriage of equals as well as being a celebration of their British and American nationalities. Each of them have causes that they care deeply about such as the environment, equal rights and the rehabilitation of injured servicemen and women. We chose the interlocking symbols to reflect the strength and support they give each other.”


Harry & Meghan Windsor Knot will be available in both 330ml bottles at 4.5% ABV and in cask at 4% ABV and the first orders are shipped on Tuesday 3rd April.


Anatomy of: Barley Wine

Anatomy of barley wine

The barley wine, one of the strongest tipples of the beer canon, is designed for cold days barley lit by the winter sun. Here’s all you need to know about it and three of the best. Image: The British Library

 

A barley wine is a contemplative beer, the kind of beer that you pour out in small measures, a beer that has rich fruity overtones, luscious maltiness and a fiery booziness. It’s usually dark amber in colour, but there are also pale barley wines, and it’s strong enough to make a cat speak.

Because of its strength it has always been a minority pursuit, but sustained study of its attributes reveals a beautiful beer that could be seen as the height of the brewer’s art. British brewers got there first but now barley wine is produced all over the world with North American riffs on the style invariably more hop forward. Drink deeply and study hard this style.  ATJ

STRENGTH
Some start at the relatively light strength of 7.5%, while others stretch out their limbs towards 12 or 13%. So far no one has claimed a session barley wine.

FLAVOUR
Lush is the word you might be looking for on the first sip, with rich notes of dark or dried fruit, smooth chocolate, caramel, vanilla and occasionally a bracing bitterness.

APPEARANCE
Dark mysterious amber or a well-polished mahogany though some barley wines can also be reddish gold in colour. Dive into an enticing tan-coloured head of foam.

HISTORY
‘The barley wine of the English Rhine’ was a slogan used by a brewery in the 1880s, though it wasn’t until the early 1900s after Bass’ No1 Burton Ale was called a barley wine that it was more commonly used.

AKA
Some would say that barley wine is also interchangeable with a Burton ale or even an old ale. Best to keep things simple though.

FOOD
It’s an end-of-dinner drink so eschew the port for the barley wine, especially if it’s accompanied by a slab of creamy, pungent Stilton — that way heaven lies.

WHERE TO DRINK
Because of its strength, it’s either a seasonal or brewed intermittently. Scour your local bottle shop

WEIRD FACT
British barley wine drinkers used to call the style a ‘sitting down beer’, because they had less distance to fall if they’d imbibed too deeply of it. Honest.

THREE OF THE BEST

/  Cameron’s, Where the Buffalo Roam, 11.2%
Time well spent in bourbon barrels gives this Canadian barley wine a sleek and warming character with delicate waves of vanilla, dried fruit and rich malt.

/  Arbor, Barley Davidson, 9.7%
Citra, Simcoe and Mosaic combine with nine months of barrel ageing to create a luscious and potent, fruity and caramel-smooth
palate-pleaser.

/  Harvey’s, Christmas Ale, 7.5%
If you left this burnished mahogany hued and richly malty beauty out for Santa on Christmas Eve he’d be reluctant to leave and demand more.


THE 6 PACK: Imperial Stouts

THE 6 PACK:
Imperial stouts

It’s the time of year for the imperial stout. Adrian Tierney-Jones charts the remarkable history of this beer and picks out six of the best

 

Ladies and gentlemen, please stand, an imperial stout has just walked into the room, a beer of gravitas and history and heritage, a muscular beer with a heft and weight that would bode well if it ever wanted to work as a circus strongman or woman. This is a beer that is ideal for contemplation, a brewing deal struck with the devil perhaps, a beer that, like IPA, was thought to be buried in the archives of history 30 years ago, and again like IPA it has sprung back to life, with the vivacity of a desert flower after the rains.

In the 19th century, it was oh so different, imperial stouts (perhaps masquerading under the name of Double or Extra Stout) were a common part of many a brewery’s portfolio, strong and expansive sipping beers. Then after World War I had decimated the British brewing industry in more ways than one, they declined and by the 1980s Courage Russian Imperial Stout was near enough all on its lonesome. In 1998, five years after it was last brewed, the then owners of the brand, Scottish & Newcastle, announced the end of the beer – in 2011, the beer was brewed by Charles Wells of Bedford, and there have been several vintages brewed since, though at the time of writing the beer seems to have vanished off the radar. Mind you, elsewhere the imperial stout is a healthy monster, a bold statement by many a brewery, large and small, throughout the world, in North and South America, in Europe, and of course in its British homeland, a demonstration that they’re not afraid of alcohol and heady dark malts. Though sometimes if you want an imperial stout you might find yourself flummoxed as I was during a recent trip to a Mikkeller bar in Copenhagen. I wanted was an imperial stout, but instead I was offered one fermented with Sahti yeast and another one that had cake mix and biscotti. I didn’t know whether to cry or raise a glass to such questionable ingenuity. The imperial stout has come a long way since its gaslit origins and I suspect it will keep on travelling.

——-

/ Harvey’s Brewery, Imperial Extra Double Stout, 9%

Brutal in its darkness, coffee, chocolate, dark fruit, figs and Demerara sugar, alongside an appetising roastiness and subtle hint of Brett.

/ Dark Star, Imperial Stout, 10.5%

A boozy stew of dark plum and currant on the nose, alongside espresso and almond liqueur; coffee, chocolate, more dark fruit, a cosy creaminess and a slight hop bitterness round things off.

/ Saltaire Brewery, XS Imperial Stout, 8.9%

Intense roastiness on the nose alongside a softer zephyr of chocolate, mocha and dark fruit; rich and roasty on the palate with a dry finish.

/ Brooklyn Brewery, Black Chocolate Stout, 10%

If you want an alternative to Sambuca then this is it; it is spirituous, rich and mocha-like in a glass, Herculean in its reach on the palate, a destroyer of worlds and perfect for ageing.

/ Troubadour, Imperial Stout, 9%

Roast barley reaches out from the glass, alongside an arch of mocha, chocolate and toffee; the same characters tread the boards of the palate, while the finish is bracingly bitter.

/ Wiper and True, Hard Shake, 10%

Hard Shake is the ‘imperial’ version of Wiper and True’s superb Milk Shake milk stout and is loaded with chocolate malts, vanilla and the addition of cacao nibs. It’s sweetly smooth and willingly warming for winter nights. 


The fall and rise of porter

The amazing fall and rise of porter

Adrian Tierney-Jones contemplates the history of London’s beer.

Ilustration by Elliot Kruszynski for Original Gravity (elliotkruszynski.co.uk)

Porter is the beer that returned from the dead. It is the beer that rose from the grave in which it had long laid dormant, an unknown grave, as lost as the tomb of Alexander, all that was left was rumour and conjecture. Was it the drink of the men who moved London’s goods in Georgian times and gave the beer its name? Did Mr Pickwick enjoy the odd noggin? And was a dinner party really held within a wooden vat at one of the monstrous London breweries that made their name and fortune with porter?

Yet porter was real enough to me late last winter as I sat in the cool, shaded confines of the Royal Oak, a Victorian-style corner pub that is a few minutes stroll from Borough Market. The Oak is the London flagship of Sussex brewery Harvey’s and a place where its complex Porter can be studied at length, especially welcome on a cold, crisp and introspective winter’s day such as this. 

The beer was sleek and sensuous in the glass, a confection of treacle toffee, chocolate, vinous fruit, saddle leather, tobacco box and even hints of dandelion and burdock.

It was a beer to be studied and appreciated at length, a beer that beguiled. Over several glasses a series of lines from TS Eliot’s Little Gidding swirled to mind: ‘for history is a pattern/ Of timeless moments./ So, while the light fails/ On a winter’s afternoon, in a secluded chapel/ History is now and England.’

Ok I wasn’t in a chapel but the light was failing on a winter’s afternoon; I was in England and there was something devotional in the way in which I regarded the beer in front of me. That’s the problem with porter — it is inspirational, but it can also become an obsession as well. 

If IPA (or more frequently a mash-up of IPA) is one of the first beers that a new craft brewer thinks about making when they go pro, you could bet your very last hop sack of Citra that the next beer style/variation/thingy they chance their arm at will be a porter (though some ambitious souls have been known to zoom straight into saison). The beer has an aura about it, a gravitas in the glass, a sheen of heritage and the theme tune of history that makes it so endlessly fascinating. It is seen as the first world beer, the beer of the industrial revolution; it’s London’s beer gift to the world (Burton and London share IPA but porter belongs to the capital). It’s porter. 

However, it’s easy to sit back in an imaginary armchair and pontificate about porter as it was, but what about now? In modern terms porter is Janus-faced as brewers look backwards and forwards as they make it: categories include Imperial porter, Export India porter, London porter, Dublin porter, Baltic porter, table porter, coffee porter, pastry porter (WTF?) and of course just plain porter (which takes us neatly back to London). That’s the exciting thing about what craft brewers (for want of a better word) are doing with beer — they are taking venerable styles and bringing them back to the future. 

American craft brewers first resurrected the beer, adding lots of hops but still maintaining the creamy, soothing centre that in my mind differentiates modern porter from modern stout (though some argue that they are the same beer, the world’s not going to come to an end). I have always enjoyed the lush, smoky, bitter, mocha-like temperament of Anchor’s Porter, perhaps one of the first returnees to the porter fold in 1972; I believe it is one of the best examples of the American style. Then there is Alaskan Smoked Porter, with its rich malt character, peppery hop, stewed fruits and bonfire night smokiness (Stone’s Smoked Porter is an equally smoky ravishment). 

Everyone’s got a porter in the US: some have more hops in them than is decent; others are aged in all manner of barrels, while Ohio brewery Willoughby produce a peanut butter cup coffee porter, which is not just pushing the envelope but setting up the Pony Express and the Post Office all at once. This might not taste like a porter from the early 19th century but who cares?

Sometimes a beer style should be seen as a blank music manuscript with the notes and the order in which they are placed still to be decided.

In the UK, porter was slower to return: the late 1970s saw porters released by both Timothy Taylor and Penrhos Brewery, the latter famously supported by Monty Python’s Terry Jones. Sadly, Penrhos didn’t last too long, while Taylor’s Porter is rarely brewed these days, but this was the first inclination that a venerable beer style was being resurrected. Now the world of British porter is choc-a-bloc with variations on a theme from the likes of Meantime, Kernel, Fuller’s, BrewDog, Elland, Salopian and Burton Bridge, whose Porter has been brewed since the early 1980s (they also produce one with damson juice in it)

History? For a long time it was thought that landlords in the early 18th century mixed up three different kinds of beer in their cellar — the famous three threads — and that a London brewer replicated this in his brewery and hey presto porter was born. Nice story, but it didn’t happen that way — porter somehow emerged, brewers didn’t keep records, there was no Twitter and to be honest the story of beer styles emerging into the world rarely approaches an eureka moment. There are no records of Ralph Harwood (for centuries thought to be the creator of porter), running into the street, Archimedes-style, telling all and sundry what he had just discovered. As for porter’s heyday in the 18th and 19th centuries I haven’t got a clue what old time porter tasted like though the tradition of aging, or staleing, blending and the use of brown malt might suggest an exceptionally characterful beer; perhaps the lion of acridity lying down with the lamb of acidity. 

For the moment though I’m happy to lie down with another glass of Harvey’s Porter and watch the light of the day fade and marvel at the power of porter, the beer that came back from the dead. 


Porter timeline

Early 18th century London brewers start producing the beer that would be known as porter, though it was also called entire — according to Martyn Cornell in Amber, Gold & Black the name porter isn’t used much by London brewers until the 1760s. 

 1760 Whitbread opens its vast porter tun room, which replaces four private houses and whose unsupported roof span is exceeded in size only by that of Westminster Hall’s.

c1780s Guinness starts brewing porter.

1814 A porter vat at Meux’s brewery off Tottenham Court Road bursts and eight people are killed. 

1817 Daniel Wheeler’s method of roasting malt, which would give porter its distinct darkish hue, is patented. 

1890 Pardubický Porter is brewed for the first time, in the style of the dark beers of the Baltic; it is still made today and one of the few of its kind made in the Czech Republic.  

1920 While working out what beers to send for sampling at the Brewers’ Exhibition Watneys decides not to brew any porter for the event — porter is in its death throes. 

1941 Whitbread stops brewing porter.

1972 After the success of Anchor Steam in 1971, brewery owner Fritz Maytag is emboldened to start brewing Porter. 

1973 Guinness stops brewing porter

1978 Penrhos and Timothy Taylor both produce porters

2009 Evin O’Riordian founds Kernel and one of his key beers is Export India Porter.

2013 Elland’s 1872 Porter wins Champion Beer of Britain

2014 Guinness releases Dublin Porter and West Indies Porter.


Fullers & Friends - the Verdict

Review: Fullers & Friends

The Fullers & Friends project paired brewers from the London brewery, with some of the finest breweries around the country for a very special project. Here, Adrian Tierney-Jones tries the beers and gives his verdict

Adrian Tierney-Jones

Bad people collaborate with the enemy and eventually bring their world crashing down in a Gotterdammerung of the soul. Good people collaborate with friends and help to make the world a happier place. Here at Original Gravity, we were overjoyed to hear it was the latter form of collaboration that the Fuller’s brewing team undertook with its Fuller’s and Friends project. Six breweries, at the top of their game (and other such clichés that sports’ commentators like to use), undoubtedly craft, thoroughly deft in the way they make their peerless beers, joined with a Fuller’s brewer and once in the zone of zen proceeded to work out what kind of beer they would like to collaborate on. The results are these six super-dupers, a range through the home of styles and then some more. Or as Fuller’s former head brewer (and now roving ambassador for the company) John Keeling put it to me, ‘it’s an exciting project and what pleased me is the way our brewers have taken to this, it all talks about friendship in the brewing world, collaboration in the truest sense of the word’.

Flora & the Griffin — Fuller’s and Thornbridge, 7.1%

A red rye beer apparently, whatever that means beyond the fact that there’s a reddish glow to its colour (though copper-amber beneath a generous snow-white head of foam would be more accurate) and the inclusion of rye malt. This results in a tease of bready, spicy, cake-like, alcoholic notes on the nose, contrasted with an undertone of floral hop character; it’s a shy nose though, not the sort of nose that lifts itself out of the glass like a kaiju and frightens all and sundry. It’s rich and mellifluous on the palate, potent in its punchiness as it delivers rye-influenced spice, rich citrus, a mid-palate sweetness, a charge of alcohol and a dry and bitter finish that also has spice in it. It’s a generous beer, a beer that throws its arm across your shoulder and says, ‘come along my friend let’s drink some beer’. 

Peat Souper — Fuller’s and Hardknott, 7%

There’s a fascinating combination of the jingle-jangle of fruit alongside brooding smoke and peat on the nose of this black-brown smoked porter; I thought first of a wooden box that once held smoked kippers before switching to a light fruity sweetness that swung into view like a galleon emerging from behind a headland, its banners and sails in full dreadful view. It’s smoky, phenolic, creamy and fruity when tasted, speaking of a real skill in the integration of the two main characters on the flavour stage, the smokiness and fruitiness. One minute you’re on the dockside at Lowestoft in its prime, the next you’re in a kitchen with the sun streaming in and ripening a bowl of citrus and tropical fruit. 

Galleon Dry Hopped Lager — Fuller’s and Fourpure, 4.8%
As pale as a wraith, as clear as a peal of bells on a sunny Sunday morning, an ideal of the floral attributes of noble hops, treading the boards with the aplomb of a supermodel. There’s a thin mouthfeel and a quick finish, though the dryness comes back after a moment; it’s lustrous, floral and citrusy but very familiar. A refreshing hoppy pils that does what it’s supposed to do, refresh and renew, a social beer in other words.

Matariki New Zealand Saison — Fuller’s and Marble, 5.8%
Dark gold in colour, this has the classic jazzy saison character, with its aromatics of bruised ripe fruit and a yeast orthodoxy. Unsurprisingly it reminds me of 8-Wired’s saison. There’s off-the-wall fruitiness, white pepper showing up mid-palate and an all embracing dry finish. Further sips reveal more from behind the veil —a hint of Riesling’s petrol-like character, a lightness and a delicate fragrance, spindrift floating on the air. Just when you think you understand where the beer is going, it springs another surprise and cause delight to break out as if Victory in Europe was announced all over again.

Rebirth — Fuller’s and Moor Beer, 6%

This collaboration between the ebullient Mancunian John Keeling and the calm and considered Californian Justin Hawke is based on the brewing records for Fuller’s ESB when it made its debut in 1971. Light amber in colour, on the nose there is ripe citrus and a trace of banana; a sweep along the grocer’s fruit stand perhaps. A graininess makes its appearance as well; Shreddies anyone? There’s a Cointreau-like orange character (orange rather than mandarins, clementines or satsumas), plus an expressive dryness and bitterness in the finish. It seems leaner than the current ESB and those who wish to will want to drink both versions side by side.

New England IPA — Fuller’s and Cloudwater, 7%

For starters, not as hazy as you’d expect a beer of this style to be; amber-orange in colour it’s almost on the horizon of glinting but there is an opaqueness that fans of NEIPAs will be calmed by. Phew. The nose is a well-filled fruit bowl of mango, papaya and pineapple sitting on the table in a warm, sunlit kitchen. More of the same fruitiness on the palate leads to a clean finish with some dryness coming through; the fruity juiciness is judicious and delicious, with a light bitterness emerging half way through the tasting. Further exploration reveals that the fruitiness is restrained, has a looseness in the mouth like fruit juice but not the accompanying sweetness and acidity. Everyone is happy, including me.

—–

Worth buying? Of course. Some are more expressive than others, but then that’s personal preference; however, all of the beers give me different degrees of happiness, which is what this act of collaboration is all about.

Boring stuff: you can buy the six pack at Waitrose alongside your artisanal cheese and just-made sushi. Oh and while you’re in the store pick up a couple of bottles of Fuller’s Vintage (if there’s any left), one to age and the other to eat with your cheese. And another oh, I suspect you can also buy it from the website, but you’ll have to find that out yourself, we can’t hold your hand for everything.

Adrian Tierney-Jones


Six Pack: New England IPAs

Six Pack: New England IPAs

What exactly is the hazy beer du jour, and why is it so popular

Original Gravity

So where did the New England IPA, this IPA sub-style, this non-style even, this hybrid of hops, this fantastic beast straight out of Narnia (or should we think Gormenghast, but please read on), this virtuous paragon of haze and hoppiness come? New England, as the name suggests, could be the home though as is often the case with beer, self-proclaimed historians might suggest that the style’s origins are cloaked in mystery with more claims than an office full of ambulance-chasing lawyers.

However, for the sake of pity and peace, let’s settle on The Alchemist’s Heady Topper as the ur-beer, the one that went on before everything else and started yet another path down which IPA can meander.

And now, when we think of a New England IPA, we have a variety of beers beneath this name, being brewed in the USA, the UK and — as I discovered on recent visit to Germany — Berlin. Turbid, milky, burnt orange in colour and it also seems a beer to make anger rise to the surface as if the devil was abroad. ‘They’re all shit’ as someone posted on my Twitter feed when I asked the blog/mob-o-sphere their thoughts on the beer (while more recently another beer writer tweeted a pic of an New England IPA where bits and pieces of something or other swirled about in the glass — I had drank the same beer, the BrewDog/Cloudwater V2 collaboration, and noted no bits and pieces).

So how shall we proceed? How about that the New England IPA is resonant with the erotic possibilities of ripe and bruised tropical fruit skin on both the nose and palate, prickly with the sharp bite of carbonation, Las Vegas crooner smooth in the middle palate, laced with a lushness of juiciness, lacking in bitterness, and when cold and correctly brewed, as drinkable as any beer style, whatever its origins and designation. ATJ

/ Black Market Brewing, Batch 001, 7.5%

Black Market Brewing make beers with Herculean-strength hops. This “New England-style IPA” adheres to “style”, but has a welcome thwack of bitterness.

/ Unbarred Brewery, NEIPA, 5.5%

Proof that a self-proclaimed NEIPA can’t have a hint of bitterness. Massive tangerine and pineapple on the nose. More fruit on the palate, but with a dry bitter twist making it very drinkable.

/ De Molen/Magic Rock, Magic & Tricks, 8.4%

Woah, this is a big, sweet, fruity and alcoholic, and with cornflakes. This Magic Rock/De Molen collaboration is so fruity, syrupy, it needs care and attention.

/ Odyssey Brew Co, The Cult, 6.7%

This darkly amber beer has the hallmarks of a NE IPA, but with the attitude the label suggests. Low on bitterness, but big on the dank, allium aroma. On the tongue, a grown-up fruit cocktail.

/ Cloudwater vs BrewDog, New England IPA V2, 8.5%

Aromatics of mango, papaya and the sternness of biscuity malt spring from the glass, while the tropical fruit continues with a creaminess, a juiciness and a dry finish.

/ Red Willow, Perceptionless, 6.6%

Macclesfield’s Red Willow are not afraid to call Perceptionless a New England IPA, explaining that in their view the sub-style is all about lots of aromatics and a juicy mouth feel. And of course the haze.


Brooklyn Cloaking Device

BROOKLYN CLOAKING DEVICE

Brooklyn Brewery’s remarkable new beer is a 100% Brett fermented porter.

Original Gravity

Porter, London’s own drink, used to be stored in wooden barrels and it would have been exposed to whatever bugs were clinging onto the wood. The beer would have tasted, well we don’t know what it would have tasted like, but I’d imagine a fair few would have been a bit sour, a bit, well, earthy. Brooklyn Brewery, under the eye of the immensely talented Garrett Oliver, has produced a porter, aged in oak barrels that once hosted red wine and fermented with Brett, the yummy yeast strain that adds a umami-like, tomato savouriness to beer. It’s then fermented again in a champagne bottle, with champagne yeast. Alongside the Brett notes, this 10.5% imperial porter has coffee-berry fruitiness, and slice of pineapple.

DN / brooklynbrewery.com