I Am A Brewer: Cask launches new canning machine

I AM A BREWER: Cask launches new canning machine

Cask Global Canning Solutions – the inventors of micro-canning equipment for craft brewers – has released another revolutionary canning line

 

NOTE: I AM A BREWER is Original Gravity’s brand that looks at industry news.

Cask Global Canning Solutions – the inventors of micro-canning equipment for craft brewers – has released a uniquely versatile canning line.

Cask’s new Micro-Automated Canning System (mACS) packages both carbonated and uncarbonated beverages. The mACS also fill cans of varying heights and diameters – from 163 mL to 568 mL in volume – and the changeover between cans can be done in less than 30 minutes. 

“The mACS,” says Cask founder Peter Love, “gives brewers the ability to create new revenue streams and beverages. They can quickly shift to new can sizes for current products, or jump from beer and cider to soft drinks and uncarbonated beverages such as cold brew coffee, wine and energy drinks.” 

Dead Armadillo Craft Brewing (Tulsa, Oklahoma) is now using the mACS to can its beer and a new product.

“When you add a liquid nitrogen doser to the mACS,” says Todd Phillips, Dead Armadillo’s Director of Operations, “you can use it to can coffee. So after many months of R&D, we’re entering the nitro cold-brewed coffee market with some friends at a local coffee roaster. It’s a brave new world for us that wouldn’t have been possible without Cask.”

“The mACS supports a larger array of can sizes than any line we have ever seen,” Phillips adds, “and we can change from can sizes, lid formats, and product types with minimal effort.” See the brewery’s mACS in action:  http://www.cask.com/2018/02/dead-armadillo-takes-beer-macs/

The mACS  has electric cam-driven seamers, three CO2 pre-purge heads, three fill heads, and a post-fill rinser and dryer. It measures just 7 by 2.5 feet and has a very small footprint of 17.5 square feet. It has a recipe memory feature that automatically sets the fill settings for speedy transition between different beverages.

The mACS conveyor belt can feeder (as found on Cask’s larger ACS machine) allows for adding such automated pre- and post-packaging components as a depalletizer, inline date coder, nitrogen doser, pressure-sensitive labeler, shrink sleever and other components.

“Since it can be equipped with an array of automated components,” Love says, “the mACS also enables our customers to scale up the automation of their canning process as they grow and diversify.”

The machine’s unique filler technology combines fill-level sensors with proprietary foam-control valves.  Those features produce filled cans with extremely low dissolved oxygen pickup of just 5-20 parts per billion — better or comparable to large-scale and much more expensive canning and bottling lines.

The mACS fills 20+ cans per minute and 50+ cases per hour with just one operator.

Get more details and see the mACS package cold-brewed coffee at http://www.cask.com/2017/12/meet-macs-micro-cannings-most-flexible-system/


BOOK REVIEW: The Craft Brewer's Compendium

BOOK REVIEW:
The Craft
 Brewer’s Compendium

Adrian Tierney-Jones delves into the pages of Ted Bruning’s ‘omnibus of brewing materials’ and finds it a trove of information

 

Choose a new hobby, choose a new washing machine, choose a new variety of hops, ok then, let’s choose life. Talking and thinking about hops (and malt and mashed veg for that matter), you might want to also choose a copy of this rather fascinating book, whose modus operandi is a rigorous run-through of all the various grains, malts, hops and yeasts that you can use to make beer (mind you my first glance of the cover — a washed out image of what look like hops — made my heart sink and my interest flutter away like a piece of paper on the wind). However, my advice is perseverance, which is the approach I took, and with that in mind you will embark on a fascinating journey through every ingredient that brewers are currently using to make beer.

If you want to know to know what happens when you use garden peas in the mash (popular in Soviet-era Lithuania) or prickly pear, then this is a book to dive into and get your ideas for the beer that will wow all and sundry (I suppose you could be making an IPA, an India Pea Ale that is, which would get round all the objections to Black IPAs). As for hops, there are around 300 varieties listed in the book, each entry compact but solidly sparged with essential information such as the character and the alpha of the variety. There’s also the lowdown on yeast, the aforementioned mashed veg (bet you thought we were having a giggle but do have some garden peas or a carrot), and malted and unmalted grains. Be warned though, this is not a how-to-brew book, more a what-can-I-use guide that both brewers and those interested in beer like myself will find fascinating.

Ted Bruning (for whom I used to write when he edited What’s Brewing) is a very clear and easily understood writer; he is not a fancy dan man or addicted to being asymmetrical. He’s also been a busy bloke in the production of this book as he has burrowed like a mole through the online sales catalogues of hop merchants, maltsters and yeast labs, and then gone through other websites, before dropping into home-brewers’ forums and news groups. The result of this Herculean research is this neat little book with a dull cover. I think it’s worth getting for Christmas (or any time really).

The Craft Brewers’ Compendium — An Omnibus of Brewing Materials, Ted Bruning with Technical Editor Don Burgess (www.posthousepublishing.com, £14.95).