HOW TO AGE A BOTTLE OF BEER

“Yeah, I’m ageing some Orval at the moment.” It sounds quite technical, perhaps even daring. But ultimately, ageing beer is simply resisting the urge to drink them straight away.

All beers age if they aren’t drunk.

They oxidize, and most beers will start to taste stale and papery after their best before date. But some beers age in interesting ways, and even attributes like oxidation can come through positively if they’re in a beer that’s complex enough to work with them.

I WANT MY BEER TO AGE:

  • Choose strong styles such as barley wines, imperial stouts or Trappist ales. If they’re bottle conditioned this will help, as the slow production of carbon dioxide from the secondary fermentation will slow oxidation. But beers age in other ways too so any strong, complex beer is worth a go.
  • Store in a cool, dark place such as a cupboard, or, if you’re lucky enough, a cellar. Warm areas age beers faster.
  • Unlike wine, beer bottles should be stored upright, so the beer doesn’t come into contact with the cap.

I DONT WANT MY BEER TO AGE:

The first change in ageing beers is that the strong, hoppy character breaks down. If you want to drink a juicy IPA at its best, drink fresh and store chilled at all times.